Great Black Music

  • Tuesday Oct 6 2020 - 13:00
  • Wednesday Oct 7 2020 - 13:00
  • Thursday Oct 8 2020 - 13:00
  • Friday Oct 9 2020 - 13:00
  • Saturday Oct 10 2020 - 10:00
  • Sunday Oct 11 2020 - 10:00
  • Tuesday Oct 13 2020 - 13:00
  • Wednesday Oct 14 2020 - 13:00
  • Thursday Oct 15 2020 - 13:00
  • Friday Oct 16 2020 - 13:00
  • Saturday Oct 17 2020 - 10:00
  • Sunday Oct 18 2020 - 10:00
  • Tuesday Oct 20 2020 - 13:00
  • Wednesday Oct 21 2020 - 13:00
  • Thursday Oct 22 2020 - 13:00
  • Friday Oct 23 2020 - 13:00
  • Saturday Oct 24 2020 - 10:00
  • Sunday Oct 25 2020 - 10:00
  • Tuesday Oct 27 2020 - 13:00
  • Wednesday Oct 28 2020 - 13:00
  • Thursday Oct 29 2020 - 13:00
  • Friday Oct 30 2020 - 13:00
  • Saturday Oct 31 2020 - 10:00
Halles de Schaerbeek
Rue Royale Sainte-Marie
1030 Schaerbeek
+32 2 218 21 07
Mandinka griots, Mississippi bluesmen playing melancholic tunes, New Orleans bars, Manhattan clubs, Yoruba rhythms, Afrobeat, Maloya chants, samba… from the ska and reggae from Kingston to the hip-hop from the Bronx: the voice, the tempo, the rhythm, the untamed soul of millions of deported slaves has created an incredibly rich musical history. Four hundred years of injustice haven’t stopped creativity and freedom. Black music has shaped the pop culture all around the globe and transcends ethnic and nationalist ideas. That music is at the same time African, American, Caribbean and European. It crossed continents and centuries. Each generation remembers a specific tune and all the emotions that came with it, a certain groove. Les Halles recreate the Great Black Music exhibition to tell this extraordinary story. How can you do justice to the thousands of artists that live in our memory? We can’t cover them all, so we have decided to cover a few sensorial and immersive themes. We looked at geography and history and went through hundreds of audio and video documents, films and images to create an interactive story. This exhibition is not academic but is about feelings. Like Adarno said: ‘Knowledge has no other light than that of redemption relating to the world: everything else is exhausted in reconstruction and remains simple technique.’Mandinka griots, Mississippi bluesmen playing melancholic tunes, New Orleans bars, Manhattan clubs, Yoruba rhythms, Afrobeat, Maloya chants, samba… from the ska and reggae from Kingston to the hip-hop from the Bronx: the voice, the tempo, the rhythm, the untamed soul of millions of deported slaves has created an incredibly rich musical history. Four hundred years of injustice haven’t stopped creativity and freedom. Black music has shaped the pop culture all around the globe and transcends ethnic and nationalist ideas. That music is at the same time African, American, Caribbean and European. It crossed continents and centuries. Each generation remembers a specific tune and all the emotions that came with it, a certain groove. Les Halles recreate the Great Black Music exhibition to tell this extraordinary story. How can you do justice to the thousands of artists that live in our memory? We can’t cover them all, so we have decided to cover a few sensorial and immersive themes. We looked at geography and history and went through hundreds of audio and video documents, films and images to create an interactive story. This exhibition is not academic but is about feelings. Like Adarno said: ‘Knowledge has no other light than that of redemption relating to the world: everything else is exhausted in reconstruction and remains simple technique.’